International Taxes

International tax laws administered by U.S. and foreign governments can dramatically affect business decision making, job creation and retention, plant location, competitiveness, and the long-term health of the U.S. economy. The basic tenets of sound tax policy are that income should be taxed once and only once—as close to the source as possible—and that a tax system should be neutral to business decision making.


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